Image of Don’t throw out your used produce bags! Here are all the AMAZING things you can use them for

Don’t throw out your used produce bags! Here are all the AMAZING things you can use them for

This article is shared with permission from our friends at modernhippiehousewife.com.

I have become a bit of a mesh-produce-bag collector and connoisseur. There are different types of these bags – hard plastic, soft plastic, big holes, small holes etc., and I use the various types for different purposes.

How To Make Your Own Mesh Produce Bags

 

I try to be as waste-less as possible so I was ecstatic to discover the different ways that mesh produce bags can serve many unique purposes!

Generally, I try to avoid buying anything that comes in packaging that isn’t recyclable, but there are a few unavoidable cases. For example, if I want organic avocados, lemons and sweet potatos, then I’m often stuck buying them in the plastic, mesh bags because that’s usually the only way they’re sold (in my grocery store, at least).

But fuelled by our desire to live waste-free lives, my mom and I have come up with 3 awesome ways to re-purpose mesh produce bags, thus saving them from a lifetime in the land-fill.

3 Awesome Ways to Re-purpose Mesh Produce Bags

3-Awesome-Uses-for-Mesh-Produce-Bags



#1 – Make Garden Rope

Right before your eyes, you can transform a mesh produce bag into a durable, yet soft, garden rope which is absolutely IDEAL for tying back tomatoes, flowers and fruit trees because the softness of the “rope” doesn’t cut into the plant. I also use the rope for tying together bean poles and making a trellis, but go ahead and get creative – sky’s the limit!

The best kind of produce bag to use here is the “soft” ones that avocados come in. Simply cut the end off, and stretch width-wise to make a big circle. Voila – rope. Make the rope as long as you wish by looping one through the other (pictured below).

PicMonkey-Collage

#2 – Use to Dry Flowers and Herbs

Produce bags are perfect for drying herbs and flowers. Air flows freely through the holes which are small enough that pieces don’t fall out. I like to clothes-pin them to a drying rack and leave them to dry in full sun, which only takes about a day or two in the summer.

The best types of produce bags for the job, I find, are the the larger bags that yams and potatoes come in, which don’t convert to a “ropes”. Also, produce bags with huge stickers are good too (like citrus bags) because the sticker will just destroy the bag if you try to take it off – so just leave it on.

#3 – Great for Straining, Soaking and Sprouting

If you soak or sprout your seeds and nuts, then you probably use a cheese cloth to strain them. But do you know what’s better then a cheesecloth? You guessed it! A Mesh Produce Bag!

Hard plastic produce bags with small holes are ideal. You can also double up the bag for straining smaller seeds/nuts.

soaking

Source:

modernhippiehousewife.com

Image Sources:

http://modernhippiehousewife.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/3-Awesome-Uses-for-Mesh-Produce-Bags.jpg

 

 

A gift for you from our founders:

Over the past year, my friend Dave at PaleoHacks has been working on a secret cookbook with world-renowned Le Cordon Bleu chef Peter Servold.

Well, today this new this new incredible Paleo Cookbook is finally available to be shipped right to your door for FREE

That's right — as a special launch promotion, we’re offering our brand new Paleo fat loss cookbook to you for free (Chef Pete lost 60 lbs using these recipes!) — All you have to do is just cover a small shipping cost (international shipping is a bit more).

Get your FREE copy of Paleo Eats Here. (Grab this today, because we only ordered a small batch of these cookbooks for this freebie promotion, and they will sell out FAST!)

Get The Free Cookbook