7 Great Reasons Why Dogs Truly Are Man’s Best Friend

7 Great Reasons Why Dogs Truly Are Man’s Best Friend

Trust me, if you don’t have a dog, there’s a special kind of love you haven’t known. It’s no wonder they are called man’s best friend.

Dogs are steadfast and amazingly loyal. They are those companions who offer unconditional support and non-judgemental love every day. To have a loving dog is to have a source of comfort that never dims. The acceptance they give is like none other. Whether they are greeting you when you’ve just arrived home or they are begging for food, the joy and happiness they bring into your life are indeed immeasurable.

 To put it simply, dogs are amazing.

From service dogs and therapy dogs to working dogs and home pets, canines play a huge role in the lives of several people. Below are seven more reasons why dogs will continue to retain the title of ‘man’s best friend’.

They help us live a healthier life

Numerous studies have documented the health benefits of owning a dog. Some of these benefits include a lower risk of cardiovascular disease, longer life span, reduction in allergies and asthma in kids, etc., all of which are derived from exercising our dogs regularly. 

One of these studies is the Kardiozive Brno 2030 conducted by researchers at the International Clinical Research Center at St. Anne’s University Hospital in Brno. The study looked at the health of people who owned dogs, people who owned other types of pets, and people who didn’t own any pets. They found that people who owned dogs and exercised them significantly benefited from physical activity.

In general, people who owned any pet were more likely to report more physical activity, better diet, and blood sugar at an ideal level. The greatest benefits from having a pet were for those who owned a dog, independent of their age, sex and education level,” said Andrea Maugeri, Ph.D., a researcher with the International Clinical Research Center at St. Anne’s University Hospital in Brno. [1]

Dogs help to improve your mood

Dogs can help to improve your mood and relieve tension. Studies have revealed that playing with a dog will elevate the serotonin and dopamine level in your system. These neurotransmitters will create feelings of emotional stability and well-being, which can help with mild to moderate depression.

 Dogs offer loyalty and protection

There have been numerous stories of dogs who continue to visit their owner’s tomb after death. This is a testament to their loyalty. They are loyal to their owners and will go to great lengths to protect them from any harm. Dogs are territorial, and they have sharp instincts that will help them react quickly if they feel you are in danger.

Dogs will keep you happy

Dogs make great company and will keep you happy. Even when you’ve had a bad day, seeing your dog wagging its tail and offering you unconditional love will surely improve your mood.

Dogs are great companions for the elderly

Dogs help to reduce anxiety and depression are great companions for the elderly. They are non-judgemental listeners that will provide companionship for older people suffering from conditions like dementia and Alzheimer’s, a study found.

The study, which was conducted on 56 residents from two suburban Maryland nursing homes, found that the duration and frequency of socialization behaviors (smiles, leans, verbalization, look toward, and tactile contact) increased, and agitation decreased in Alzheimer’s patients who owned dogs. What’s more? They had fewer emotional outbursts and less aggression than patients who did not own a dog.

Dogs have amazing talents. 

Dogs play a significant role in our lives. From therapy dogs that are trained to provide affection and love to people who are going through mental health conditions or facing fatal health illnesses to service dogs that guide the blind and help to heal war-scarred veterans, dogs are truly man’s best friends.

Dogs see us as their family

No, it’s not an exaggeration; neither is it our imagination. Dogs see humans as family. A group of cognitive scientists at Emory University placed dogs under an MRI machine. Before their brains were scanned, the dogs were presented with different odors. Some aromas were from other dogs, some were from food, and some were from the dogs’ human companions.

The scan showed that the dogs’ brains’ reward centers lit up most when presented with their companions’ scents, showing that dogs recognized and prioritized human relationships. [2]

References

  1. Your heart’s best friend: Dog ownership associated with better cardiovascular health.” Mayo Clinic. Terry Malloy. August 23, 2019.
  2. Brain Scans Show Dogs Think of Humans as Family More than Fellow Dogs. Big Think. Orion Jones. November 23, 2014.
  3. Puppy love — it’s better than you think.” NBC News. Jane Weaver. April 8, 2004.
  4. The Impact of Different Dog-related Stimuli on Engagement of Persons With Dementia.American Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease And Other Dementias. Marcia S. Marx, Jiska Cohen-Mansfield, and Khin Thein. Accessed February 13, 2020.
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